Online Events

ISPGR is pleased to announce that the society will be hosting a series of online events throughout 2020 and 2021 to facilitate scientific exchange and continue to support the membership and community. Sessions will consist of a series of talks around a specific theme and should include a keynote lecture and 4 – 6 associated papers for a duration of approximately 2.5 hours.

Online Symposium – Current evidence for cortical control of balance and gait

December 3, 15:00 UTC

Every day we must continuously adjust our posture to maintain balance and avoid falling.  The prevalence of balance impairments associated with cortical lesions (e.g., stroke) demonstrates the importance of the cerebral cortex for human balance.  This symposium will present an overview of recently revealed cortical correlates of balance and gait, which show that cortical activity does not only indicate cognitive and motor interference (for example during dual task) but also reflects dynamic adaptation of the gait pattern and reactive balance responses.

The symposium will consist of keynote presentations, invited speaker presentations and live Q&A periods over a duration of 2.5 hours.

 

Note – a recording of the webinar will be available to ISPGR members in the member only area of the website within a few days of the presentation.

 

Confirmed Schedule

 

15:00 Welcome Address
15:05 Keynote Lecture – Dan Ferris
15:35 Martin Seeber
15:55 Brenda Malcolm
16:15 Aiden Payne
16:35 Teodoro Solis-Escalante
16:55 Keynote Lecture – Johanna Wagner
17:25 Closing Remarks

Note all times are UTC

 

Registration

Registration is now open!

The Online symposium is free and open to all researchers, scientists and students interested in posture and gait research.

Please note the recorded version will only be available to members of the Society.  Take out a membership to watch this, and other future online events at your leisure.

Confirmed Speakers

Dan Ferris

Dan Ferris

University of Florida

Mobile brain imaging of dynamic balance can improve human balance training
Brenda Malcolm

Brenda Malcolm

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Aging alters cortical contributions to balance
Aiden Payne

Aiden Payne

Emory University

Perturbation-evoked cortical responses are associated with balance ability
Martin Seeber

Martin Seeber

University of Geneva

Distributed EEG source imaging during gait
Teodoro Solis-Escalante

Teodoro Solis-Escalante

Radboud University Medical Center

Cortical correlates of postural stability
Johanna Wagner

Johanna Wagner

Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience, University of California San Diego

EEG source imaging reveals inhibitory cortical dynamics in gait adaptation
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